Tag Archive - kitchen

Jadite!

AStoriedStyle.com

Happy Monday, everyone!  How was your weekend?  This weekend was a good one for me – lots of great family time, homemade pancakes, my oldest son’s first baseball “tryouts”, finding the perfect item for a client, some goodies to list on Gypsy Soul’s Facebook page, and drumroll please…a beautiful set of vintage jadite dishes found at an estate sale.  Pinch me, they were a steal.  I first saw jadite in college when on one of my “clear my head” antique mall trips.  Immediately, I was drawn to their beautiful translucent mint green color.

Pioneer Woman

Pioneer Woman

I wish I had bought them in college since a few years later, Martha Stewart had her jadite collection on her show, and everyone went nutso for it!  And of course, up went the prices.  Now whenever I see it in a store, a plate is $40!  So I have been content to admire it from afar, though it’s hard to get that lovely hue out of one’s mind.

Elizabeth Anne Designs

Elizabeth Anne Designs

Jadite, also known as Jadeite, was a popular form of dinner ware and restaurant ware beginning in the late 1930′s to early 1970′s.  McKee was the first to manufacture it, though Jeanette Glass Company is credited with giving “jadite” its name.  The Anchor Hocking Glass Corporation was jadite’s largest producer, renaming it “Jade-ite” and launching several colors under the “Fire King” name in 1942.  Literally given away in oatmeal boxes and grocery stores for buying a certain amount of an item, it was touted as your go-to, heavy-duty, can’t-hurt-it dishware.  It was not fine china by any means, so as you can imagine, its popularity is confusing to many that were eating off of it at their local diner in the 1950′s.  In fact, a lady at the estate sale was so surprised at how excited I was about my purchase, she said, “Well, my goodness, I have had two huge boxes of that stuff in my attic for thirty plus years!”  I then asked her where she lived.  I’m kidding.  Sorta.

Which reminds me…this weekend, my father informed me he had two huge mid century abstract paintings in his storage unit, where they have been sitting for 30 years.  Ummm, hello!  Don’t worry, I’m on it.

Back to jadite…I love the freshness it gives a space.  It is just so happy and clean and bright and pretty.

Source Unknown

Source Unknown

Jadite Kate

Jadite Kate

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Source Unknown

The collection that began the craze.

Martha Stewart Living

Martha Stewart Living

Apparently, the egg cups are rare and valuable.  On a side note, does anyone know what the dish they are serving from the egg cup is called?  It looks yummy to me, and they eat it on Downton Abbey all the time.

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Source Unknown

Country Living

Country Living

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Source Unknown

I LOVE when plates are displayed this way!

Apartment Therapy

Apartment Therapy

Coastal Living

Coastal Living

Urban Grace

Urban Grace

Country Living

Country Living

How gorgeous are these kitchens?

Better Homes & Gardens

Better Homes & Gardens

Better Homes & Gardens

Better Homes & Gardens

Velvet & Linen

Velvet & Linen

Graham & Co

Graham & Co

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Source Unknown

Country Living

Country Living

Holly Doodle Designs

Holly Doodle Designs

My favorite (and what I hope to do in a couple of cabinets in my own kitchen) is mix my jadite with vintage Fire King turquoise and white ware.  I like the collected look, and those colors together are right up my alley.

Jadite Kate

Jadite Kate

Source Unknown

Source Unknown

If you see jadite in a store, it is usually fairly pricey, unless you stumble upon someone who doesn’t know what it is.  Score!  But you can occasionally find some good deals on CraigsList and Ebay, so if you love it, keep an eye out.

Do you love jadite?  Do you have any in your home?

P.S.  I also wanted to tell you  I am having vascular surgery tomorrow bright and early, so if I am not around tomorrow or the next day, you will know why.  I am having some blood clots in my legs and malfunctioning veins removed, plus my doctor is re-routing some other veins to help my vascular system function better.  I should be fine and dandy, but if you think of it, I would appreciate the prayers.  Knowing myself though, I will probably be at the grocery store with the kids the next day, ha!  xoxo

Written by Grace

 

 

 

 

 

Campaign Hardware Moves to Kitchens and Bathrooms

You might think campaign furniture is trendy, but really, it has been around since at least the time of Julius Caesar.  It is most often associated with British military officers in the 18th century, who frequently traveled with high quality portable furniture.  It was designed to be easily transportable; therefore, a typical chest would break down into a few pieces.   When the destination was reached, the furniture would be put together.  Because officers of high position in Britain would just not be able to be without the luxuries of home on the road, campaign furniture was the perfect crossover of the luxuries of home and the practicality of travel.  Inset handles, brass corners to protect from bumps, and typically made of a durable wood such as teak or mahogany, campaign furniture was a staple for many years.

With the arrival of the motor car, traveling with loads of cargo went out of vogue, and the demand for campaign furniture changed.  However, it has never really gone out of style, and ebbs and flows in popularity.  A resurgence of interest in this type of furniture occurred in the 1960′s and 1970′s, and there is most assuredly a revamped desire for campaign furniture in recent years.  Kristen and I can hardly keep it for more than a few days when we list it, and it is harder and harder to find.

dhshardware.com

A variety of campaign hardware from dhshardware.com

Most often, you see campaign hardware gracing chests and desks and other case goods.  These pieces look gorgeous painted in any color.  Recently, I saw a piece that was left a gray, raw wood color, and it was perfection.  My own living room houses a campaign chest, see the photo below.  Maybe you wouldn’t think of putting a chest of drawers like this in a living room, but it has been soooo practical for us.  It houses light bulbs, linens, and trays.

AStoriedStyle-LivingRoom6_2

Image by Kat Phillips, TheGrayAttic.com

In the last few years, I have been seeing campaign hardware more and more in bathrooms and kitchens.  I love brass so I think it looks terrific, and there is something so beautifully aged about the campaign hardware look.

What do you think of campaign hardware in a kitchen?

Barry Benson

Barry Benson

The Hunted Interior

The Hunted Interior

The Hunted Interior

The Hunted Interior

The Hunted Interior

The Hunted Interior

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Source Unknown

House and Home

House and Home

House and Home

House and Home

House Beautiful

House Beautiful

 

Or in a bathroom?

Iconic Kelly Wearstler Bathroom

Iconic Kelly Wearstler Bathroom

Van Rozeboom Interiors

Van Rozeboom Interiors

Source Unknown

Source Unknown

La Dolce Vita

La Dolce Vita

 

What are your thoughts?  Would you like campaign hardware in your kitchen or bathroom?  Do you have any elsewhere?

Written by Grace

Today I’m Dreaming Of…Open Kitchen Shelves

A Life’s Design

Open shelves in the kitchen.  I heart them.

I’m also dreaming of a boar’s head with a ring through its nose on my pantry door.  Okay, maybe not.

What are you dreaming of today?

Have a great weekend all.  I have been so busy this week gathering supplies and ideas for some great holiday DIY’s coming up!  Stay tuned.

Also, I could not go this week without sending my thoughts and prayers to those affected by Hurricane Sandy.  And thank you for all of the emails, both of my brothers, my sister-in-law, and nephew are all safe and sound.  They don’t have power, but they are making it!

 

 

It’s The Little Things: The Smallest Houseplants You Have Ever Seen

One of my secret dreams is to be an amazing gardener with a lush, wild-looking English garden.  I will consistently wear a large sunhat with a linen tie and white linen clothes that never look dirty, even after I have been calmly gardening all day.  When someone compliments a plant in my garden, I will say things like, “Oh yes, I love when ____ plant is here in the fall, but wait until the spring when the ____ bloom”, and not bat an eye.  Oh, and I will always, always smell like lavender.

I actually learned quite a bit about gardening when I lived in Branson, Missouri.  Since I had friends with large families (10 children or more!), I spent time with them in their family gardens.  It also helps that my Dad is a licensed nurseryman (as a hobby) and is a walking encyclopedia of plants.  So I am developing my green thumb.  However, my love for gardening and planting and growing and harvesting is not restricted to the outdoors.  Especially in the Fall and Winter, I focus on keeping a garden of sorts in my home.  If you read this post, you have seen the greenery in my entryway.  My husband recently commented on how pretty some plants looked near the kitchen sink after I left them there after watering.  It got me to thinking how I could practically work plants into that area.

Knowing I needed the counter space to be free since that is such a heavy work area, my only option was the tiny window sill.  Instantly, I remembered something I had seen in one of my favorite booths called “diGs” at one of the local antique malls.  (Montgomery Street for you readers from DFW)  Aren’t these tiny little pots darling?  They are literally three inches tall and have that perfectly aged look.

When I first saw these little pots, I wondered what I could do with them because surely, plants that small are not sold anywhere.  Well, I was wrong.  A quick trip to Archie’s Gardenland in Fort Worth revealed a plethora of varied fens in tiny pots.  They were around $3 each.  Side Note:  If you have to have some of your own lilliputian plants after reading this, and are not sure where to find them, I would check with your local, generally smaller and more specialized nurseries.  (i.e. not Walmart, Lowes, etc.)  Call around and ask before you take any long trips.  These little guys would be great for terrariums, too!

After selecting ten ferns that would be happy in my window, I tackled my next problem – the fact these little pots had no drain hole in the bottom.  I pondered what to do and ended up ever so lightly puncturing the bottom of them with a large nail.

I did have one casualty though.  Bummer.  I will have to go back and grab one more.  Hope they’re still there!

Then the planting could begin!

I had a cute little four-year-old using a measuring cup to water our freshly planted ferns.

My next thought was…”Hmmm, okay, what should I have the pot with the newly punctured hole drain into?”  As much as I would love to find a charming little set of old dishes, I knew I wanted to get my project done, and I liked the idea of the old pots paired with something more modern. Maybe someday I will find just the right set of old dishes, and maybe I will switch them out.

I headed to World Market – I find stores with a global aspect always have interesting little things that work for projects like this – and quickly found my solution.

These square mini tasting plates fit the bill perfectly.  Although on the site there is a set of four for $11.96, in-store they were .99 each, plus I had a 10% off coupon!  Boom!

I couldn’t help but share some of the other items in their “mini tasting” collection that would be adorable for a variety of uses, but would be especially cute as planters for tiny ferns.  All you would have to do is buy a drill bit that will work on ceramic, drill yourself a tiny hole, and voila! You have an interesting outside-the-box planter.

You could write the name of each fern on these, so cute!

A bit more modern look found here.

I think these mini tureens as planters would be so fab!

I almost changed my entire plan when I saw this little mug set.  How cute and different would these be as mini planters?!

While shopping at Crate & Barrel for a client last week, I saw the Brooklyn long vase which I think would also make a pretty holder for plants on a window sill or a narrow space.

Before my big “tiny” reveal, I thought I would share some useful information about houseplants.  Not only are they pretty, they are physically and mentally beneficial.  Really!  Which is exactly why I am not a fan of faux greenery in a home.  Faux houseplants are dust collectors – if you have allergies or asthma, this is bad news.  Plus the pretend plants will not have these benefits:

1.  Indoor plants have been shown to reduce cold-related illnesses by more than 30% due to their increasing humidity levels and decreasing dust.

2.  We breathe the same air in our homes again and again, potentially inhaling harmful substances that are trapped inside. Indoor plants can help to remove pollutants including VOC’s that cause headaches, nausea, and more.

3. House plants can contribute to a feeling of wellbeing, making you calmer and more optimistic. Studies have shown that patients who face a garden view in their hospital rooms often recover more quickly than those facing a wall.  Even plants in the room make a difference!  Patients request less pain medication, have lower heart rates and blood pressure, experience less fatigue and anxiety, and are released from the hospital sooner.

4. Exposing children to allergens such as plants early in life can help them build a tolerance and immunity to the allergen. It works like a custom allergy shot, naturally.

With that in mind, say hello to my new health booster by the kitchen sink.

They make me happy every time I see them.

Do you have any house plants?

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